Fellowship

The Australian Academy of Health and Medical Sciences elects the best and brightest minds in the field of medical and health sciences as Fellows.

Fellows are elected in recognition of their outstanding achievements and exceptional contributions to the sector. The Fellowship are acknowledged for their clinical, non-clinical, leadership, industry and research contributions.

About Fellowship with AAHMS

Find Fellows of the AAHMS

To find Fellows of our Academy either use the search form below or download the full list of current Fellows here.

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Name

Position

Level

Elected

State

Executive Director Clinical Innovation, Riverland Mallee Coorong LHN; Emeritus Professor, Flinders University
SA Health
Fellow
2015
SA

Professor Paul Worley is a rural doctor and Emeritus Professor at Flinders University. His ground‐breaking work in the science of rural community based medical education, and its impact on addressing the maldistribution of doctors for rural and underserved areas, has changed the face of medical education and rural medical workforce policy nationally and internationally. His leadership of junior doctor training in general practice has transformed the transition from medical school to post‐graduate training for general practice. He is a past President of the Rural Doctors Association of SA, a previous Vice President of ACRRM and consultant to the WHO.

Professor and Head, Discipline of Medicine
University of Adelaide
Fellow
2015
SA

Professor Wittert is a senior Endocrinologist and scientist of national and international standing, earned through 25 years of dedication to excellence and innovation in basic science, clinical and population-based research. His achievements are multidisciplinary and include new understandings of the physiology of food intake, metabolism and body composition, the consequences of obesity beyond heart disease and diabetes, hormones and ageing and engagement by men in health care. These have translated into new clinical guidelines, interventions and resources for obesity, urological, reproductive disorders and service delivery, and medical training, as well as his specialist and health policy committee appointments across organisations.

Deputy Director; Senior Scientist, Cancer Control Group
QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute
Fellow
2015
QLD

Professor David Whiteman is a medical epidemiologist at the QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute. He is internationally recognised for his research into the causes, prevention and control of cancer, particularly those of the skin and gastrointestinal tracts. Professor Whiteman’s research findings have been translated into policy and practice, and he holds leadership positions in national and international research committees and policy forums. His research excellence has been recognised previously through awards such as the Fulbright Senior Scholarship (2006), Young Tall Poppy Award (2001) and the Nuffield Fellowship to the University of Oxford (1997).

Chair of Dermatology
Medical University of Vienna
Fellow
2015
International

Professor Weninger is one of Australia’s preeminent clinician scientists working in the fields of dermatology and immunology. He is internationally recognised for discovering several unique immune cell subsets and determining their function in the context of immune-mediated pathology, especially as they relate to skin diseases. He has pioneered the development and use of intravital imaging models for the study of leukocytes at the cellular and molecular level in their physiologic environment. His work has resulted in a new understanding of immunoregulatory pathways in cutaneous inflammatory conditions, infections and cancers.

Pro Vice Chancellor and Vice President: Health Sciences
University of South Australia
Fellow
2015
SA

Robert Vink is considered a pioneer in the field of traumatic brain injury. He was the first to apply magnetic resonance techniques to the study of energy metabolism in brain injury, and subsequently discovered and characterised the critical role of magnesium in the secondary injury cascade following neurotrauma. Serum magnesium concentration is now carefully controlled in brain injury patients. His research continues to advance the understanding of acute brain injury, having recently identified substance P’s role in raised intracranial pressure. This has resulted in the development of a novel class of drugs that reduce pressure and potentially prevent posttraumatic neurodegeneration.

AO FAA FAHMS
Assistant Director
The Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research
Council Member
2015
VIC

David Vaux opened the molecular era of cell death research by identifying the first component of the mechanism cells use to kill themselves, showing that failure of cell death leads to the development of cancer, and demonstrating that the cell death mechanism is evolutionarily conserved. He helped identify and characterise two families of cell death inhibitors, which underpinned the development of new classes of cancer therapies that work by activating the cell death machinery in cancer cells.

Co-Deputy Director
Victor Chang Cardiac Research Institute
Fellow
2015
NSW

Jamie Vandenberg is an international authority on cardiac ion channels and has made breakthrough discoveries in understanding how these channels work and how drugs interact with these channels; contributing significantly to our understanding of the molecular basis of cardiac arrhythmias. In recognition of his expertise in this area he has been invited to sit on an international panel advising the Food and Drug Administration (USA) on how to best tackle the problem of drug-induced cardiac arrhythmias, which has been the commonest cause for drugs to be withdrawn from the market after regulatory approval.

Emeritus Professor and Distinguished Scientist
Monash University
Fellow
2015
VIC

Alan Trounson was responsible for many of the developments that made human in vitro fertilization a clinical success for treating female, male, idiopathic infertility, and preimplantation genetic diagnosis. He cofounded the Institute for Reproduction & Development, Monash University. He led the team that independently discovered human embryonic stem cells and founded the Australian Stem Cell Centre. He returned to Monash as Director and Personal Chair in Stem Cells, founding Monash Immunology & Stem Cell laboratories. Trounson was appointed President of the Californian Institute for Regenerative Medicine for 6.5 years – a $multibillion agency for basic and translational stem cell research.

FRS FAA FAHMS
Deputy Director and Head of Embryology Unit
Children’s Medical Research Institute
Fellow
2015
NSW

Patrick Tam is a world leader in the study of mammalian development and his scientific achievement has put Australia on the global map of developmental biology. He pioneered the application of experimental embryology and genome editing to elucidate the cellular and molecular architecture of the basic body plan. His work has contributed to the construction of detailed fate maps for the embryo and the understanding of pathogenic mechanism of birth defects. He has a prominent leadership role through advisory, consultative and editorial activities. Patrick is a fellow of Australian Academy of Science, Royal Society of Biology, and Royal Society of London.

Chair, Dermatology Research Centre, The University of Queensland
The University of Queensland
Fellow
2015
QLD

Professor H. Peter Soyer is an academic dermatologist with over 30 years’ experience in the field. He is considered a pioneer in the field of dermoscopy of pigmented skin lesions, leading the development of the classification system currently used worldwide. He has contributed to Australian Government guidelines on melanoma management. Since relocating to Australia in 2007, Professor Soyer has achieved over $15M in research funding for UQ for translational melanoma research. He is dedicated to increasing dermatological services to poorly supported rural areas by establishing a state-wide store-and-forward teledermatology service, and performing outreach visits to remote communities within Queensland.

Our Fellows sit at the heart of everything we do. They represent Australia’s leading minds in health and medical sciences, having been recognised for their clinical, non-clinical, leadership, industry and research contributions.

To be considered for election to the Academy’s Fellowship, a candidate must show exceptional professional achievement in a field related to health and/or medicine.

Fellows contribute to the projects and activities of the Academy and must be willing to be active participants. 

Successful Fellowship candidates will have shown:

  • Outstanding leadership in their field.
  • Significant and ongoing involvement with issues of health care, prevention of disease, education, research, and health services policy and delivery.

Candidates for Fellowship should meet the following criteria:

  • National and International recognition for excellence in health and medical science
  • Significant, sustained and ongoing contributions to advance health and medical science in Australia (relative to opportunity)
  • Contribution to the profession through leadership and mentorship
  • Raised public understanding and promoting health and medical science in the broader community
      •  

Download criteria for Fellowship

Each year, current Fellows of the Academy are invited to nominate up to four new candidates who meet the criteria and fulfil the required expectations.

Nominations by a Fellow of two new candidates must ensure that at least one nomination is a woman. Nominations by a Fellow of four new candidates must ensure that at least two nominations are women.

How to make a nomination

Fellows wishing to nominate a candidate for Fellowship should contact the Secretariat for application forms and further instructions on how to submit the completed nomination documentation. 

Fellows wishing to nominate a candidate for a Corresponding Fellowship should contact the Secretariat for more information.

Secretariat contact details
Email: [email protected]

Phone: 07 3102 7220

Nomination guidelines for ordinary Fellowship

October 2021
Newly elected Fellows of 2021 are inducted at the AGM/Scientific Meeting.

October 2021-November 2021
Nominations are invited from existing Fellows until the closing date of 30 November.

December 2021
Nominations allocated to Selection Committees.

January – April 2022
Referees’ reports sought.

Early May 2022
Selection Committees meet to consider nominations and provide final recommendations to the Council.

Early-to-Mid-July 2022
Council meets to finalise recommendations.

Late July 2022
Full Fellowship invited to comment on recommended new fellows.

Early August 2022
Newly elected Fellows are informed of their successful appointment.

October 2022
Newly elected Fellows of 2022 inducted at the AGM/Scientific Meeting.

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